Wetherby Pembridge’s educational approach is to integrate the beneficial aspects of single-sex education in a co-educational setting, thus combining the best of both approaches. Boys and girls receive instruction separately in subjects where research points to differences in learning styles[1]. For all other curricular areas, Wetherby Pembridge children learn together as a community, forging life-long friendships and maintaining a healthy social life.

Single -sex education

At Wetherby Pembridge School, single-sex education begins at Kindergarten in the core curriculum subjects of English and Mathematics. We have adopted this approach to foster academic confidence in all of our children, providing the conditions in which each child can achieve the best possible outcomes. Our goal is for every child to feel comfortable pursuing their own interests, without falling into common stereotypes about what boys and girls may be “good” at.

Co-Education

A co-educational environment offers opportunities for children to develop social and emotional skills and healthy relationships with others. Our boys and girls participate in most curriculum subjects together, and enjoy a wide range of extra-curricular activities, assemblies, community service projects, and performances as a community.

In summary, Wetherby-Pembridge’s approach is both family-friendly and educationally sound.

Read Graham Able’s opinion piece: “Are Boys and Girls better educated separately?”

Graham Able

Graham AbleGraham was Chief Executive Officer of Alpha Plus from 2009-2014. Prior to that, he spent 40 years teaching in independent schools, the last 21 as a Headmaster in London. He retired from the Mastership of Dulwich College in August 2009. He is a former Chairman of the Headmasters’ and Headmistresses’ Conference and was President of the International Boys’ Schools’ Coalition for 3 years. A keen sportsman, he is a member of MCC.

 

[1] Robinson and Gillibrand, (2004); Van de Gaer, Pustjens, Van Damme and De Munter,

(2004); Jimenez and Lockheed (1989)